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Prevent Injury

Player Welfare

The GAA has developed a player welfare and medical scientific website on
http://www.gaa.ie/medical-and-player-welfare .
The website is managed by a group of professional medical personnel dedicated to providing the best medical advice to all players og Gaelic Games .We have published a mere summary here.Please consult the website for full details


Guidelines for Safe Exercises
What are you trying to do?
Is the exercise part of the warm-up, the game, a conditioning activity or part of the recovery? What you are trying to do should be dependent on why you are doing it.

The golden rule is to prepare the body, work it correctly and recover it afterwards
Prepare the body
Warm-up exercises aim to prepare the body for the planned activity. This means that exercises should:
• Concentrate on increasing muscle temperatures
• Use movements that help switch on the relevant motor programmes
The best way to do this is to start gently with locomotor movements that involve large muscle groups, such as the legs, such as walking or jogging.

Hurling and Gaelic football require a variety of foot patterns. Include heel taps, toe taps, side steps, and back steps should precede more complex moves involving foot crossover patterns.Incorporate dynamic flexibility exercises to stretch the muscles to be used in the activity,without losing the flow of the warm up.
Work Properly
Conditioning and game actions are best and safest when done with:

• Control
• Good Posture and Body Alignment
• If activities are performed too fast or too slowly the moving and supporting joints can experience excessive loads.
• Too many repetitions of the same movement can compromise control and posture.
a. Posture and correct body alignment are important in order to:
b. Provide maximum support for the body with minimal strain
c. Improve the efficiency of the action
• Reduce unnecessary stress on joints

Recovery
Many coaches play down or ignore the importance of this part of an activity. is the best time to teach stretching exercises and relaxation techniques to help restore
the body to a normal functioning state. can also use this time to reinforce points made during the session, or provide players
with instructions on team play

• What are you trying to do?
• Is it relevant to the game or the aim of the session?
• Is it effective? Does it do what you want it to do?
• Is it safe? Does it do what you want it to do without affecting control or posture?

Exercises to Avoid
There are many exercises that are effective but are best avoided because they compromise body parts. In addition to lack of control of movement, poor posture and body alignment and often too many repetitions of the same action, some of the old fashioned exercises that are potentially dangerous include:

There are many exercises that are effective but are best avoided because they compromise body parts.

In addition to lack of control of movement, poor posture and body alignment and often too many repetitions of the same action, some of the old fashioned exercises that are potentially dangerous include:

• Excessive loads of the neck and spine (Avoid these movements)
• Neck circling and rolling
• Extreme neck movements —backwards (extension) or forwards (flexion)
• Bending forward to touch the toes or similar actions
• Bending forward without support and twisting
• Bending backwards to an extreme position
• Straight leg sit ups
• Straight leg raise activities
• Sits ups with feet or ankles held
• The plough position (feet over head to touch the floor)

Excessive Load on Knees (Avoid these movements )
• Full knee bends
• Locking knees (keep knee softly bent)
• Knee rotation
• ‘Duck walking’
• Hurdlers stretch

Excessive Loads on the Elbows and Shoulders (Avoid these movements)
• Locking or snapping the elbows
• Impact push ups
• Holding hands above the head for more than 20 secs

Cool-Down after exercise
After every training session you should do a cool down. The cool down is equally as important as the warm-up.

Benefits
• Your body is cooled down gradually
• Recovery time is reduced enabling more effective training sooner afterwards
• Benefits of the training session are increased as body adapts better

Guidelines
• Jog for 3-4 minutes

Incorporate
• Change in direction
• Raising knees to waist level
• Raising ankles to buttocks
• Side stepping using both legs as lead leg
• Mobilisation Exercises
• Rotate Arms Backwards at controlled pace
• Rotate Arms Forwards at controlled pace
• Rotate Hips clockwise, counter-clockwise
• Rotate ankles clockwise, counter-clockwise
Stretching Exercises
• Hold all stretches for 20-30 secs and repeat twice
• Stretch Gradually, Do Not Bounce
• Never Stretch beyond comfort

Hamstrings
Lie on back on ground. Bend left knee to 45-degrees. Raise right leg upwards and Place hands below knee joint, Pull leg towards head (comfortably), keeping leg as straight as possible. Keep head rested on ground. Alternate.

Quadriceps (Thigh Muscles)
Lay on right side on ground. Bend lower leg (left knee 90-degrees) out in front. Rest Head on left arm. Grab right foot below ankle and pull towards right buttock. Keep right leg parallel to ground. Alternate (Roll to other side).

Calves
Sit on ground with legs extended in front. Bend left knee to 45-degrees. Extend arms and reach out to touch (as near as possible) right foot. Hold. Alternate.

Groin
Sit on ground with feet pulled in and meeting in front of body. Keep Back straight. Grab ankles with hands and place elbows at inside of knees. Push Knees down towards ground.Hold. Repeat.

Full Body
Lie on back on ground. Extend both arms above head. Stretch out with hands and feet.Relax. Repeat. stretches are conducted on the ground to prevent blood pooling, which can lead to cramps and aches.

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